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Causes of Misleading Public Statements about Nuclear Fusion
Complete List of All Reports in This Series
By Steven B. Krivit
Originally published: March 22, 2018
Updated: April 24, 2018
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The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), under construction in southern France, has received significant media and Internet attention in the past decade. Most news articles and Web sites that are intended for lay audiences, as shown on this page, contain inaccurate information about ITER's purpose and design objectives. The primary sources for that information are the ITER organization headquarters and some of its national affiliated domestic agencies.

The main inaccuracies that have been communicated are that the ITER reactor as a whole (not just the plasma) is designed to a) produce significantly more power than it will consume, b) demonstrate a thermal power output 10 times greater than the reactor's power input, and c) produce 500 MW of thermal power from only 50 MW of power to operate the reactor.

In fact, only the plasma is designed to produce 10 times more thermal power than the 50 MW of thermal power injected into it. The ITER reactor as a whole (not just the plasma) is a) designed to produce slightly more power than it will consume, b) expected to produce a thermal power output 1.6 times greater than the reactor's power input, and c) designed to produce 200 MW of net thermal power. The reactor will require 300 MW of electrical power to operate.

A full review of the technical details of ITER power is presented in a separate report, "The ITER Power Amplification Myth"; however, a quick summary is useful.


Key Technical Facts About ITER Power

  • ITER is designed to produce fusion products: neutrons and alpha particles. These particles will be measured by their thermal energy.
  • ITER is designed to achieve a gross thermal output of 500 megawatts. ITER is not designed to convert this thermal power to electricity.
  • ITER is designed to consume, and will require, 150 megawatts of electrical power, which will be used to inject 50 megawatts of heating power into the reaction chamber.
  • ITER is also designed to consume, and will require, an additional 150 megawatts of electrical power to operate the machine.
  • The planned total power consumption required to produce the 500 MW thermal power output for ITER is 300 MW of electricity during peak plasma output and 400 MW, momentarily, to get the reaction started.
  • If the gross thermal output of 500 MW is compared with the minimum electrical input of 300 MW, the power amplification, or reactor gain, will be 1.6.
  • With the gross thermal output of ITER at 500 MW, the maximum net output will be 200 MW, though this does not compare like terms. If the thermal output were converted to electricity, the net electrical power output would be negative 100 MW.
  • The 300 MW value has not been published by the ITER organization. Only an ambiguous range of values, "110 MW up to 620 MW," has been published by the organization.
  • In January 2017, after officials from ITER received multiple requests for the minimum required electrical power inputs, the officials failed to provide that information.
  • The required electrical input values were obtained from three fusion experts, independently, representing some of the most prestigious fusion research institutions in the world.
  • New Energy Times published the 300 MW value on Oct. 6, 2017. Thereafter, major fusion organizations, including ITER headquarters, ITER India, ITER Russia, EUROfusion, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, began correcting some of their false and misleading public statements.
  • JET, the most successful fusion reactor in history, consumed 700 MW of electrical input power in its best experiment, on Oct. 31, 1997. The thermal power injected into the reaction chamber was 24 MW. The emitted thermal output power was 16 MW. It emitted only 2 percent of the power needed to reach reactor breakeven. Stated another way, the best fusion reactor output-to-input power ratio has been 2 percent.

Primary Causes of the Inaccuracies
  • Fusion experts have given the phrase "fusion power" two different meanings, have publicly used the phrase ambiguously, and have not publicly defined the secondary meaning. For example, prior to October 2017, the Wikipedia reference for "fusion power" did not explain it, the ITER glossary did not include it, nor did the EUROfusion glossary.
  • Fusion experts, in the context of claims of commercial fusion reactors, have not, in any instance known to New Energy Times, publicly reported electrical power required to operate reactors. Instead, they publicly disclosed only a subset of that power, the thermal power injected into the reaction chambers.
  • Fusion experts made claims that reactors, or experiments, in the context of commercial fusion reactors, would produce net power when, in fact, only the thermal power balance of the plasma would be positive.

Primary Sources

Some sources made corrections to their Web sites after "The ITER Power Amplification Myth" published on Oct. 6, 2017. Notations of the corrections are indicated in the list below.


Paul-Henri Rebut, Director of ITER Design Activities (Fusion Engineering and Design)
(May 1995) "During extended performance operation, ITER will be capable of producing more than 1000 MW (electric) of fusion power, an amount of power that is comparable with one of today's electricity generating plants."

Rebut envisioned ITER producing 1500 MW thermal and 1000 MW electric. He therefore imagined a thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency rate that did not exist. He imagined a reactor design that was not shared by other fusion researchers. A February 1995 U.S. Office of Technology Assessment provided the actual and accurate plan at that time: "ITER is expected to be capable of producing over 1,000 megawatts of thermal fusion power." The final ITER design was scaled back to 500 MW thermal. In later decades, most fusion proponents added to the public confusion by removing the word "thermal" when describing the planned power output of ITER.


ITER Spokesman Neil Calder (Instructions to His International Public Relations Team)
(April 10, 2008) "Strategy: Implement consistent message worldwide ... The energy coming out of ITER will be 10 times greater than the energy going in. Input power 50 MW - output power 500 MW."

This is a false and misleading statement for a non-expert audience.


ITER Web Site - Introduction Page (Archive Copy)
(2007) "It will generate 500 MW of fusion power for extended periods of time, ten times more than the energy input needed to keep the plasma at the right temperature. It will therefore be the first fusion experiment to produce net power."

This paragraph contains multiple misleading statements for a non-expert audience.

ITER Web Site - Facts and Figures Page (Archive Copy)
(2010 - Nov. 5, 2017) "The goal of the ITER fusion program is to produce a net gain of energy and set the stage for the demonstration fusion power plant to come. ITER has been designed to produce 500 MW of output power for 50 MW of input power - or 10 times the amount of energy put in. The current record for released fusion power is 16 MW (held by the European JET facility located in Culham, UK)."

This paragraph contains multiple misleading statements for a non-expert audience.  

My communications with the ITER organization began on Dec. 19, 2016. I sent an e-mail to Bernard Bigot, the director-general, and asked him how much power the ITER reactor was expected to consume to get the 500 MW thermal output. At the time, I could find no public record of this fact. Bigot did not respond. Instead, I received a response from, and exchanged e-mails with, Laban Coblentz, the head of ITER media relations. Coblentz failed to answer the question. Ten months later, I had obtained the input power value from other sources and published it on Oct. 6, 2017. One month later, the ITER organization made partial changes to its Web site.


ITER Web Site - Facts and Figures Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 6, 2017 - Current) "ITER has been designed for high fusion power gain. For 50 MW of power injected into the tokamak via the systems that heat the plasma, it will produce 500 MW of fusion power for periods of 400 to 600 seconds. This 10-fold return is expressed by Q = 10 (ratio of heating input power to thermal output power). The current record for fusion power gain in a tokamak is Q = 0.67, held by the European JET facility located in Culham, UK, which produced 16 MW of thermal fusion power for 24 MW of injected heating power in the 1990s."

The ITER organization corrected this paragraph to accurately inform non-experts of details about ITER and JET.


ITER Web Site - Home Page, Gallery Image #2, "Amazing Machine" (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 13, 2015 - Nov. 5, 2017) "The ITER Tokamak will be the largest and most powerful fusion device in the world. Designed to produce 500 MW of fusion power for 50 MW of input power (a power amplification ratio of 10), it will take its place in history as the first fusion device to create net energy."

This paragraph contains multiple misleading statements for a non-expert audience.

ITER Web Site - Home Page, Gallery Image #2, "Amazing Machine" (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 6, 2017 - Current) "The ITER Tokamak will be the largest and most powerful fusion device in the world. Designed to produce 500 MW of fusion power for 50 MW of input heating power (a power amplification ratio of 10), it will take its place in history as the first fusion device to create net energy."

This correction adds only the word "heating." This paragraph still contains multiple misleading statements for a non-expert audience.

ITER Web Site - "In a Few Lines" Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 13, 2015 - Current) "The world record for fusion power is held by the European tokamak JET. In 1997, JET produced 16 MW of fusion power from a total input power of 24 MW (Q=0.67). ITER is designed to produce a ten-fold return on energy (Q=10), or 500 MW of fusion power from 50 MW of input power."

The statement "total input power of 24 MW" is false and misleading. This paragraph contains multiple misleading statements for a non-expert audience.


ITER Web Site - "Beyond ITER" Page (Archive Copy)
(<=June 1, 2010 - ~Nov. 6, 2017) "JET succeeded in generating 70 percent of input power. Scientists have now designed the next-step device – ITER - which will produce more power than it consumes: For 50 MW of input power, 500 MW of output power will be produced."

In the context of a Web site for the general public, the statement about JET is false and misleading. The statement about ITER, in this context, is also false and misleading.


ITER Web Site - "Beyond ITER" Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(~Nov. 6, 2017 - Current) "JET succeeded in generating 16 MW of fusion power, for 24 MW of power used to heat the plasma (a Q ratio of 0.67). Scientists have now designed the next-step device – ITER - as a Q≥10 device (producing 500 MW of fusion power for 50 MW consumed by the heating systems)."

These statements are more accurate but still misleading because they do not explicitly inform the public that the values apply only to the plasma, rather than to the reactors.

ITER India Home Page (Archive Copy)
(Mar. 6, 2009) "ITER will produce at least 10 times more thermal energy than the energy required to operate it."

This is a false claim.


ITER India Home Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(<= Jan. 30, 2017) "ITER will produce at least 10 times more energy than the energy required to operate it. In future demo or commercial reactors based on fusion, this energy can be converted to electricity."

ITER India removed the word "thermal," making the false claim even more misleading.

On Dec. 15, 2017, I sent an e-mail to the following people about the false claim: Shishir P. Deshpande, ITER India project director, Bernard Bigot, ITER director-general, and Srivastava. On Dec. 18, 2017, Deshpande replied to me: "Thank you for your message. We will take appropriate action." They did.


ITER India Home Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(<= Jan. 30, 2017 - Current) "ITER aims to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy." [Electricity statement deleted.]

This is an accurate statement.


ITER Korea - About Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(<=Nov. 28, 2015 - Current) "Project Outline/Main Contents: Developing and constructing a 500MW of electricity producing plant."

This is a false and misleading statement.
 

On Dec. 17, 2017, I sent an e-mail to Kijung Jung, the director of the ITER Korea project, advising him of this false claim. On Jan 7, 2018, Jung replied to me: "Thank you very much for your visit to the ITER Korea Web site. We will check it and correct if necessary." They did not.

ITER Russia - Home Page (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 14, 2011 - Dec. 21, 2017) "ITER shall generate heat in the amount comparable with commercial power plants."

This ITER Russia claim is a 10-fold exaggeration. ITER is designed to produce a net thermal output of 200 MW. According to the IAEA, 448 commercial nuclear power plants are operating, generating 391,744 of total net installed electrical capacity. That comes to 874 MWe per reactor, on average. Thermal power required for that 874 MWe is about three times as much, 2,623 MW.  

On Dec. 20, 2017, I e-mailed Anatoly V. Krasilnikov, the director of the Russian ITER agency, and advised him of the false claim. Krasilnikov did not reply to me, but he ordered a minor correction to his agency's Web site within 48 hours.


ITER Russia - Home Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Dec. 22, 2017 - Current) "ITER is designed to produce a 10-fold return on energy (Q=10), or 500 MW of fusion power from 50 MW of input power."

That Russian falsehood was corrected. This paragraph still contains false and misleading statements.

On Dec. 22, 2017, I notified Krasilnikov of the continued misleading nature of the claim. I also included these people on the e-mail distribution: Shishir P. Deshpande, the ITER India project director, Bernard Bigot, the ITER director-general, and Arun Srivastava, the incoming ITER Council chair. I sent Krasilnikov another e-mail on March 20, 2018.


ITER Japan - Home Page (Link)

This site makes no power claims on its home page.

Japan JT60 Web Site - ITER Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
“Will ITER make more energy than it consumes? … ITER is about equivalent to a zero (net) power reactor, when the plasma is burning.”

This is the only ITER-related site, to my knowledge, that gives non-experts accurate, honest and transparent information about the power output expected from the ITER reactor.

EU Fusion for Energy Web Site ITER Page (Retrieved April 22, 2018) (Link) (Archive Copy)
"ITER aims to produce a significant amount of fusion power (500MW) for about 7 minutes."

This is a misleading statement.


European Commission Document: "ITER Uniting Science Today Global Energy Tomorrow" (2007) (Link) (Archive Copy)
"[ITER will be] capable of generating some 500 million watts (MW) of fusion power continuously for up to 10 minutes. It will be 30 times more powerful than the Joint European Torus (JET)."

In thermal power, JET produced only 2 percent of the electrical power it consumed.


European Commission Document: "ITER Uniting Science Today Global Energy Tomorrow" (2007) (Link) (Archive Copy)
Page 13: "[ITER will be] capable of generating 500 megawatts of fusion power continuously for at least 400 seconds. The plasma volume will be 10 times that of JET and will be close to the size of future commercial reactors. ... The ITER experiment will generate 10 times more power than is required to produce and heat the initial hydrogen plasma."

Non-experts would not realize from this statement that the ITER reactor will require 300 MW to operate.

Page 23: "ITER is planned to operate at a nominal fusion thermal power of 500 megawatts. Assuming that DEMO will be approximately of a similar physical size to ITER, its fusion thermal power level must be greater by about a factor of three in order to deliver (at current levels of turbine efficiencies) electrical power to the grid in the range of 500 megawatts [electric]."

This is better explained graphically:



ITER U.S. Web Site (Link)

This site makes no power claims on its home page.


ITER U.S. Web Site "FAQ: ITER and Fusion Energy" Document (Link) (Linked page) (Archive Copy)
"
The typical U.S. home presently uses about 5,000 watts of electricity on a continuous basis. The fusion process has produced more than 10 million watts of fusion energy for about one second in laboratory test reactor experiments from 1994 to 1997. The ITER international fusion project is expected to produce 500 million watts for ~10 minutes."

This is a misleading paragraph.


ITER China Web Site (Link)

This site makes no power claims on the English version of its home page. The "Mission & Objectives" page does not contain any power claims.

ITER Organization Press Release (Archive Copy)
(Dec. 6, 2017) "The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a project to prove that fusion power can be produced on a commercial scale and is sustainable."

See Chart #1 above.

A notable omission in this press release is that it does not repeat the 500 MW output and 50 MW input claim, revealed in October to be misleading, which has been central to the organization's media campaign for a decade.


ITER Organization Press Release (Archive Copy)
(Dec. 6, 2017) "A commercial fusion plant will be designed with a slightly larger plasma chamber, for 10-15 times more electrical power. A 2,000-megawatt fusion electricity plant, for example, would supply 2 million homes."
 

See Chart #1 above.
Secondary Sources

Stewart C. Prager, Director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Testimony to Congressional Committee (Link)

(Oct. 29, 2009) "By any metric, we are far along the road to commercial fusion power. In the past 30 years, we have progressed from producing 1 watt of fusion power for one-thousandth of a second to 15 million watts for seconds, and ITER will produce 500 million watts for 10 minutes and longer. ... The most recent National Academy study notes remarkable progress in recent years. But my focus today is the future, the remainder of the journey to fusion power."

 

Prager's statement was misleading. He gave no indication that his first and third uses of the phrase fusion power meant anything different from his second use of the phrase fusion power.

DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Feb. 2012 Brochure (Link) (Archive Copy)

These are false and misleading statements for a non-expert audience because none of past fusion reactors created any net power and the values for the planned reactors are gross thermal output, not net thermal output values.


John Greenwald, Science Editor, DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, News Article (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Dec. 11, 2013) "[The Princeton TFTR reactor produced] a world-record burst of more than 3 million Watts of fusion energy - enough to momentarily light some 3,000 homes. ... It did so again the very next day when TFTR shattered the mark by creating more than 6 million watts of fusion energy."

This is a false and misleading statement for a non-expert audience because TFTR consumed 950 million Watts of electricity to make the 3 million Watts of "fusion energy."


Choong-Seock Chang, DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Press Release (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Sept. 26, 2017) "ITER can produce 10 times more power than it consumes."

This is a false and misleading statement for a non-expert audience.

On Oct. 13, 2017, I sent an e-mail to John Greenwald, science editor for the U.S. DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and Rick Borchelt, the director of the Office for Communications and Public Affairs of the U.S. DOE Office of Science, and notified them of the false statement. They did not respond.


Jeanne Jackson DeVoe, Princeton University News Article (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Oct. 5, 2017) "[ITER is] a massive project that will provide 120 megawatts of power - enough to light up a small city."

This is a false and misleading statement.


John Greenwald, Science Editor, DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Jan. 23, 2018, Press Release (Archive Copy)
(Jan. 23, 2018 - Feb. 6, 2018) "ITER is the international fusion facility under construction in France to demonstrate the ability to produce 10 times more power than it consumes.

On Jan. 23, 2018, I sent an e-mail to Greenwald and Borchelt and notified them of the false statement. They did not respond. On Jan. 26, 2018, I spoke with Greenwald, and he said he intended to change his text. He did not change his text. On Feb. 5, 2018, I advised Richard Hawryluk, the interim PPPL laboratory director, that this statement was false and misleading. Hawryluk made a partial correction within 24 hours.


John Greenwald, Science Editor, DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Jan. 23, 2018, Press Release (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Feb. 6, 2018 - Current) "ITER is the international fusion facility under construction in France to demonstrate the ability to produce 10 times more power than used to heat the plasma.


On Feb. 6, 2018, I advised Hawryluk this is a misleading statement because 150 MW of power will be used to heat the plasma. Only the injected thermal power is designed to be 50 MW, giving a 10-fold gain. Hawryluk made no further change.

Ian Chapman, Chief Executive Officer, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Quoted in the U.K. Sunday Times (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 12, 2017 - Dec. 2, 2017) "[JET] generates 16 megawatts of electricity, about the same as three or four windmills." [The reporter asked Chapman, "How much electricity do you need to shove into the thing for such a result?"] Chapman replied, "About 25 megawatts."

On Nov. 15, 2017, I sent an e-mail to Chapman and advised him of these inaccuracies. Chapman replied that evening: "Thank you for your e-mail pointing out the inaccuracy relating to JET performance in the Sunday Times article. I have written to the journalist to point this out." Three weeks went by, and there was no correction. On Dec. 2, 2017, I sent an e-mail to the U.K. Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the members of the U.K. Parliament Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee and informed them of the inaccuracies. The next day, the Sunday Times made a partial correction to the online version of the article, published a printed correction notice, and published a deeply buried online correction notice. But the Sunday Times corrected only one of the three falsehoods.


Ian Chapman, Chief Executive Officer, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Quoted in the U.K. Sunday Times (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Dec. 3, 2017 - Current) "[JET] can generate 16 megawatts of fusion power, about the same as three or four windmills." [The reporter asked Chapman, "How much electricity do you need to shove into the thing for such a result?"] Chapman replied, "About 25 megawatts just to heat the fuel."

Chapman's revision maintained the misleading allusion to wind turbines, which actually produce net power, and JET, which resulted in a 684 MW power loss. Chapman withheld material information about the true amount of electricity required.


EUROfusion Web Site - JET Page (Archive Copy)
(<=2015 - Nov. 22, 2017) "ITER is designed to deliver 10 times more power than it consumes."

This is a false and misleading statement.


EUROfusion Web Site - ITER Page (Archive Copy)
(<=2015 - Nov. 22, 2017) "[ITER will] generate 500 MW fusion power, which is equivalent to the capacity of a medium-size power plant."

This is a false and misleading statement.


EUROfusion Web Site - FAQ Page (Archive Copy)
(<=2015 - Nov. 22, 2017) "ITER is expected to produce 10 times the power consumed."

This is a false and misleading statement.

On Oct. 11, 2017, I sent an e-mail to Petra Nieckchen, the head of the EUROfusion communications office, and advised her of the false statements on the three EUROfusion Web site pages. She replied the next day: "We have been following your reports with interest. We are currently editing our Web site content anyway to prepare for a re-launch later this year. In this process, we will be paying special attention to the statements you pointed out to us."

On Nov. 21, 2017, I sent another e-mail to Nieckchen and copied the message to a dozen scientific representatives of EUROfusion. Without responding to me directly, 48 hours later, Nieckchen directed her staff to make corrections. The three corrections below are exemplary models of clear, factual scientific claims about ITER.


EUROfusion Web Site - JET Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 23, 2017 - Current) "The international experiment ITER is designed to confine a reactor-scale plasma. It will generate, in the plasma, 10 times more power than the power put into the plasma."

This is an accurate statement.


EUROfusion Web Site - ITER Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 23, 2017 - Current) "The experiment ITER is designed to confine a reactor-scale plasma. In this plasma, it will generate 10 times more power than the power put into the plasma."

This is an accurate statement.


EUROfusion Web Site - FAQ Page (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 23, 2017 - Current) "ITER is expected to produce in the plasma 10 times more power than the power put into the plasma."

This is an accurate statement.


Wikipedia English Site - ITER Page (Archive Copy)
(March 2, 2010) "ITER is designed to produce approximately 500 MW of fusion power sustained for up to 1,000 seconds. ... ITER is expected to produce (in the form of heat) 5-10 times more energy than the amount consumed to heat up the plasma to fusion temperatures."

This is mostly accurate. However, it implies that the incorrect amount of power consumed to heat the plasma is 50 MW, when the power consumed will be 150 MW.


Wikipedia English Site - ITER Page (Archive Copy)
(March 1, 2011) "The fusion reactor itself has been designed to produce 500 MW of output power for 50 MW of input power, or 10 times the amount of energy put in."

A year later, the details about heat input and output had been removed, leaving in place a false impression that the reactor, rather than the plasma, would produce the 10-fold gain.


Wikipedia English Site - ITER Page (Archive Copy)
(Nov. 25, 2017) "The ITER fusion reactor has been designed to produce 500 megawatts of output power for around 20 minutes while needing 50 megawatts to operate."

By this time, the false and misleading statement had been essentially unchanged for six years.

On Nov. 26, 2017, I corrected the Wikipedia ITER power sentence, as shown below, and its surrounding paragraph.


Wikipedia English Site - ITER Page (Link)
(Nov. 26, 2017 - Current) "The ITER fusion reactor has been designed to produce a fusion plasma equivalent to 500 megawatts of thermal output power for around 20 minutes while 50 megawatts of thermal power are injected into the tokamak, resulting in a 10-fold gain of plasma heating power."

This is an accurate statement.


World Nuclear Association Web Site - JET Paragraph (Archive Copy)
(As of July 29, 2017) "JET produced its first plasma in 1983 and became the first experiment to produce controlled fusion power, in November 1991. Up to 16 MW of fusion power for 1 second and 5 MW sustained has been achieved in D-T plasmas using the device."

Non-experts would not know that the JET reactor had a net loss of 684 MW of power.


World Nuclear Association Web Site - ITER Paragraph (Archive Copy)
(As of Feb 13, 2016) "The goal of ITER is to operate at 500 MWt (for at least 400 seconds continuously) with less than 50 MW of input power, a 10-fold energy gain."

This is a false and misleading statement because ITER is designed to operate with 300 MW of input power.


World Nuclear Association Web Site - ITER Paragraph (Archive Copy)
(As of July 29, 2017) "The goal of ITER is to operate at 500 MW (for at least 400 seconds continuously) with less than 50 MW of input power, a 10-fold energy gain."

This is the same as above, made slightly more ambiguous by the removal of the indicator that the output measurement will be a thermal value.

On Oct. 13, 2017, I sent an e-mail to Agneta Rising, the director-general of the World Nuclear Association, and notified her of false statements on the WNA Web site. One of her staff members replied to me and said they would attend to the matter in the following week. They didn't. On Nov. 8, 2017, after Rising's staff had made no corrections, I sent another e-mail to Rising and informed her that the ITER organization had made some corrections to its Web site. Rising thanked me for the information and made no corrections. On Nov. 28, 2017, I sent another e-mail to Rising and suggested correct text for the WNA Web site. Her staff made corrections to the WNA Web site the next day.


World Nuclear Association Web Site - ITER Paragraph (Archive Copy)
(As of Nov. 29, 2017) "The goal of ITER is to operate at 500 MW (for at least 400 seconds continuously) with less than 50 MW of plasma heating power input. It appears that an additional 250 MWe of electricity may be required in operation."

This is an accurate statement.

On Dec. 11, 2017, I published a new report, "Evidence of the ITER Power Deception," listing, among other items, this Nov. 29, 2017, correction by the World Nuclear Association. Nine days later, on Dec. 20, 2107, as shown below, WNA removed the sentence about the full input power requirement for ITER.


World Nuclear Association Web Site - ITER Paragraph (Archive Copy)
(Dec. 20, 2017 - Dec. 21, 2017) "The goal of ITER is to operate at 500 MW (for at least 400 seconds continuously) with less than 50 MW of plasma heating power input."

The statement is misleading because the reactor will not be able to operate with less than 300 MW of electrical input.

On Dec. 20, 2017, I sent an e-mail to Rising and informed her that, if she was not going to inform readers of the full input power requirement for the reactor, then she must inform readers that she is giving values of only the plasma thermal output and plasma thermal input. Her staff fixed the WNA Web site within 48 hours.


World Nuclear Association Web Site - ITER Paragraph (Link) (Archive Copy)
(Dec. 22, 2017 - Current) "The goal of ITER is to operate with a plasma thermal output of 500 MW (for at least 400 seconds continuously) with less than 50 MW of plasma heating power input."

This is an accurate statement.