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Rusi Taleyarkhan et al. Invented Variable Velocity Bullets

Rusi,

Can I rely on this as accurate? Did your bubble fusion work really lead to the v.v. bullets?

Thanks,

Steve



Uses For Variable Velocity Bullets

Source: http://clk.about.com/?zi=1/XJ&sdn=inventors&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ornl.gov
(dead link)

Police officers armed with a weapon developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be able to dial up the velocity of the bullet depending on the situation and the intent of the shooter. Using a cartridge based on the standard shotgun shell, Rusi Taleyarkhan and colleagues have harnessed the power of vapor explosions to allow projectiles to stun, disable or kill.


An artist's drawing of the futuristic aluminum and water cartridge.
ORNL

Uses For Variable Velocity Bullets

Source: http://clk.about.com/?zi=1/XJ&sdn=inventors&zu=
http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ornl.gov
(dead link)

Police officers armed with a weapon developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be able to dial up the velocity of the bullet depending on the situation and the intent of the shooter. Using a cartridge based on the standard shotgun shell, Rusi Taleyarkhan and colleagues have harnessed the power of vapor explosions to allow projectiles to stun, disable or kill.



Rusi Taleyarkhan's reactor research lead to the invention of the variable velocity bullet. ORNL

Rusi Taleyarkhan Holds A Variable-Velocity Bullet
Source: http://inventors.about.com/od/uvstartinventions/ss/Bullets_3.htm

Rusi Taleyarkhan (right) holds a variable-velocity bullet that has been shot at a target in tests at ORNL's melt-water-explosion-triggering analyzer. Seokho Kim adjusts the controls.


Date: Thu, 17 May 2007 10:22:34 -0400
From: Rusi Taleyarkhan <rusi@ecn.purdue.edu>
To: Steve Krivit
Subject: Re: Variable velocity bullets (rpt->s.krivit;5.17.07)

Steve:

Bubble fusion reactor research came about significantly after the variable velocity bullet research.

The variable velocity bullet research was based on vapor explosion technology which has proven quite a problem for the worldwide metals casting industry as well as for nuclear "fission" reactors. The infamous Chernobyl reactor accident is an example; other similar events have happened in research/test nuclear reactors in the US also due to which the nuclear safety of any water-cooled reactor has to consider such events in terms of determining overall risk during beyond-design basis accidents. I had spent many years researching this topic for nuclear reactor safety since this sort of event can be devastating in terms of fission product release to the environment and can dramatically alter the risk profile. The fire-power of metal-water reactions can be very significantly greater than that from the best of high-explosives.

Having done this sort of work resulted in understandings on how to intensify the explosive effects with "control" and also on how to prevent them - thereby, affecting both, the generation of a Star-Trek like weapon system for on-demand force projection, to aiding the metals industries where such explosions have happened quite routinely and
can/do cause widespread facility damage along with injuries, etc. The variable velocity bullet research started out as a non-lethal weapon research program in the early 1990s but then later on has become an item I can not talk about further due to security considerations. Furthermore, I can neither confirm nor deny the existence or absence of
any present research nor application of the vapor-explosion based variable velocity bullet or other related extensions.

Rusi